Can UV-A lamps, be used for GUV?

Can UV-A lamps, be used for GUV?

No. Near Ultr-Viloat (UV-A) and longer (visible) wavelengths do not have germicidally effective emission wavelengths to inactivate viruses. Their relative disinfection capability is very minimal on the order of 1,000 times less effective in terms of fluence rate than the low-pressure mercury germicidal lamp. There have been only very special applications of wavelengths in the UV-A and violet (e.g., 405 nm), which require very high doses not practical in an occupied environment and were not recommended for viral sterilization. The trace amount of UV-B that is emitted from some white-light fluorescent lamps probably has similar efficacy.

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been available for some time in the UV-A region. The advantage of UV-A or visible-light LEDs would be that they can easily be incorporated into LED-based luminaires, and there might be no need for protective gear. However, the efficacy of violet or UV-A energy that is not harmful to the skin or eyes is minimal.